Zebra and Quagga Mussel Distribution in U.S. Lakes

Eastern United States Wisconsin - 100 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Michigan - 264 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Pennsylvania - 7 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window New York - 30 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Connecticut - 5 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Louisiana - 1 lake - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Nebraska - 2 lake - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Indiana - 65 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Minnesota - 52 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Ohio - 39 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Arkansas - 1 lake - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Kansas - 17 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Iowa - 8 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Vermont - 4 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Virginia - 1 lake - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Kentucky - 2 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Texas - 7 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Oklahoma - 12 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Massachusetts - 1 lake - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Illinois - 25 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Missouri - 5 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window
Western United States Kansas - 17 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Oklahoma - 12 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Nebraska - 2 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window California - 22 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Nevada - 3 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Arizona - 6 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Utah - 2 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Texas - 7 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window Colorado - 7 lakes - click to view list of lakes by county - opens in a separate window

688 Lakes Total
in Addition to the Five Great Lakes

Click on the state to see the list
of lakes by county.  Click here to view the entire list.

Zebra mussel Google Map Version on NAS

Quagga mussel Google Map Version on NAS

Zebra mussels were first detected in 1988 in Lake St. Clair, located between Lake Huron and Lake Erie. Within just a few years, they spread into all five of the Great Lakes. Since then, zebra mussels have spread into many large navigable rivers in the eastern United States as well as small lakes within the states surrounding the Great Lakes. Hitchhiking on the bottoms of commercial barges is most likely how they were spread up and down the large rivers. Because of their ability to adhere to objects, adult zebra mussels can easily be transported on the hull of a boat. It is generally assumed that recreational activities such as boating and fishing may be unknowingly responsible for the transport of zebra mussels from lake to lake. Transporting young zebra mussels in small amounts of water is very easy and can go undetectable. Young zebra mussels in their larval form are called 'veligers' and are microscopic in size. Live wells on boats and bait buckets are two good examples of where veligers can "hide" so to speak. All these lakes have at one time had zebra mussels in either adult or veliger form. This information represents a distribution of observations and collections and does not necessarily represent the true distribution of reproducing populations. More scientific sampling would be required to make that determination.

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last update: 9/17/14


U.S. Department of the Interior   *   U.S. Geological Survey
URL: http://fl.biology.usgs.gov/Nonindigenous_Species/Zebra_mussel_distribution/zebra_mussel_distribution.html
Last Modified: 17 September, 2014

 

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